List Lists: Uncommon names in Poland that caught my eye

UncommonPoland

Time for the second ‘List Lists’ post in which I look at some of the uncommon names (in other words, those that are outside the top 100) given to Polish babies last year (2016) that caught my eye.

I doubt any of you readers are aware of this, but I was actually born in Poland but am currently living in the UK (have been for many more years than I have spent in Poland). So, with that in mind, there are various reasons (in which I’ll some of my thoughts about the names below the list) that I have chosen to add the names to the list below.

So, let’s get right to it:

  • Amadeusz – this is the form of the Late Roman name Amadeus, formed from a combination of Latin amāre meaning “to love” and Deus meaning “God.” It was given to 35 boys last year.
  • Anatola – this is the feminine form of Anatol, which is from Anatolius, the latinised form of Anatolios (taken from ἀνατολή (anatolḗ) meaning “sunrise”). It was given to 11 girls last year.
  • Bogdan – this is made up of Slavic elements bogŭ “god” and danŭ “given.” It was given to 24 boys last year.
  • Bożena – this is derived from the Slavic element bozy “divine.” It was given to 12 girls last year.
  • Brunon – this looks to be a variant form of Bruno, derived from brun meaning “armour, protection” or brun meaning “brown” (both Germanic elements). It was given to 49 boys last year.
  • Dagna – this is the form of the Scandinavian name Dagny, made up of Old Norse elements dagr meaning “day” and  meaning “new.” It was given to 6 girls last year.
  • Dobrawa – this is the form of Doubravka, the Czech feminine form of Dubravko (taken from the old Slavic word dǫbrava meaning “oak grove”). It was given to 41 girls last year.
  • Dobrochna – this is a diminutive of Dobrosława, made up of Slavic elements dobrŭ “good” and slava meaning “glory,” now functioning as a given name as well. It was given to 9 girls last year.
  • Gromosław – this looks to be a variant form of Gromisław, made up of gromŭ “thunder” and slava meaning “glory.” It was given to 7 boys last year.
  • Halina – this is the feminine form of the Greek name Galenos, derived from γαλήνη (galḗnē) meaning “calm.” It was given to 35 girls last year.
  • Halszka – this is a diminutive of Halżbieta, the archaic form of Elżbieta (the form of Elizabeth – taken from the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע (‘Elisheva’) meaning “my God is an oath” or “my God is abundance”). It was given to 14 girls last year.
  • Jadwiga – this is the form of Hedwig, which is from Hadewig (made up of Germanic elements hadu meaning “battle, combat” and wig meaning “war”). It was given to 157 girls last year.
  • Kataleja – this is the form of Cataleya, the Hispanic variant of Cattleya, a genus of 113 species of orchids stretching from the Lesser Antilles southwards to Argentina named after William Cattley. It was given to 5 girls last year.
  • Konstancja – this is the feminine form of the Late Roman name Constantius, derived from another Late Roman name Constans meaning “constant, standing still.” It was given to 83 girls last year.
  • Kordian – this is, presumably, derived from Latin cor meaning “heart,” the (Polish) name first coined in the drama of the same name (as its known in English), considered one of the most notable works of Polish Romanticism and drama, published in 1834. It was given to 138 boys last year.
  • Kosma – this is the form of Cosmas, derived from the Greek name Κοσμᾶς (Kosmâs), from κόσμος (kósmos) meaning “order, decency.” It was given to 62 boys last year.
  • Krzesimir – this is derived from the Slavic elements krěsŭ meaning “spark, light, rouse” and mirŭ meaning “peace, world.” It was given to 15 boys last year.
  • Maurycy – this is the form of Maurice, derived from the Roman name Mauritius (a derivative of Maurus meaning “dark skinned.” It was given to 74 boys last year.
  • Noemi – this is the form of Naomi, derived from the Hebrew name נָעֳמִי (Na’omiy) meaning “pleasantness.” It was given to 109 girls last year.
  • Sambor – this is derived from the Slavic elements samŭ meaning “(one)self” and borti meaning “to fight.” It was given to 23 boys last year.
  • Syntia – this looks to be a variant form of Cyntia (which is the form of Cynthia – a Latinised form of Greek Κυνθια (Kynthia) which means “woman from Kynthos,” Kynthos being the mountain on the island of Delos), likely influenced by Cynthia‘s diminutive, Cindy. It was given to 6 girls last year.
  • Wawrzyniec – this is the form of Laurence, derived from the Roman cognomen Laurentius meaning “from Laurentum,” Laurentum (probably derived from Latin laurus meaning “laurel”) being a city in ancient Italy. It was given to 11 boys last year.
  • Zenon – this is derived from the name of the Greek god Zeus, from Proto-Indo-European *dyḗws meaning “sky” or “heaven.” It was given to 9 boys last year.
  • Ziemowit – This is derived from the elements sěmĭja “family” and vitu “lord, master.” It was given to 56 boys last year.

My thoughts: It’s a pretty diverse mix of new discoveries (Halszka, Sambor), modern surprises (Kataleja) and dated names still in use that left me…surprised (Halina, Bogdan). For me, the most interesting name that I like is Halszka. It reminds me of the name Halsey that I found from one of Abby (of Appellation Mountain)’s ‘baby name of the day’ posts a while back and I took a liking for this name back then.

Which of these names do you like best? Which of these do you hate the most? Leave your thoughts in the comments section below the sources.

Main sources:
Behind the Name – https://www.behindthename.com/
Wiktionary – https://en.wiktionary.org/
Polish Wikipedia – https://pl.wikipedia.org/
Ministry of Digital Affairs (in Polish – for name data) – https://mc.gov.pl/dodatkowe-materialy

Advertisements

One thought on “List Lists: Uncommon names in Poland that caught my eye

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s